Category: AfriWork

AfriWork, English Tutor

I and Me

By English Tutor: I and me tend to cause confusion when in combination with other nouns or pronouns. Politeness dictates that you should mention others before yourself in sentences. E.g. Cynthia and I enjoy reading Jane Austen books. My sisters and I have the best of fun playing with the children. However, in spoken English me is often used in […]

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AfriWork, English Tutor

Some general reminders

By English Tutor: Borrow and lend. I want to repeat this because I still come across quite a bit of confusion. The one who uses borrow in a sentence is the one who is obtaining something. The recipient of something is borrowing from another. The giver of something is lending it to someone. Who and whom. Whom is rarely used […]

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AfriWork, English Tutor

Its and It’s

By English Tutor: The confusion between these two is because one of them is a possessive pronoun (its) and the other one (it's) has an apostrophe which is frequently used to mark possession. It's is simply a shorter version of saying it is or it has. Eg. The dog finished it's dinner. This sentence looks acceptable but if you mentally […]

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AfriWork, English Tutor

Where, Were and Wear

By English Tutor: Where, were and wear. The three words are commonly confused in writing more than they are in speech. Where = has to do with location. E.g. where did you go over Christmas? Were = is a form of the past tense to be used after we, you and they or a plural noun. E.g. we were at […]

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AfriWork, English Tutor

Want and Need

By English Tutor: The distinction between the two lies basically within what the intended meaning is. Wanting something has to do more with the desire for something. The wanting of something is not a matter of life or death in grammatical terms. When  someone or something is in want of something, there is no urgency. Interchanging want and need with […]

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AfriWork, English Tutor

Vowels and Consonants

By English Tutor: -A – E -I -O -U.  These are called vowels and they form part of the alphabet. They are important as it is rather difficult to form a word without using them. They give the sound to the words we write and say. If you doubt this, try saying a word without a vowel and see how […]

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AfriWork, Hand Print

CACE Book Talk Intellectuals

By Kathryn Kazibwe, Uganda: Who are Africa's public intellectuals, and what is their role in our time and society? This was the topic of discussion at the inaugural CACE Book Talk session that took place on the 26th of January 2013. While it was evident that a clear-cut definition of an intellectual was difficult to agree on, the discussants all […]

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AfriWork, English Tutor

Sentence Structure

By English Tutor: English grammar is very particular in how you can be allowed to structure certain sentences. Using the right word in a sentence at the wrong place in a sentence can make it either meaningless, change the meaning completely or make it ambiguous  and unless either one of these three is intended by the writer, then grammar rules […]

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AfriWork, English Tutor

Punctuation Marks: How and when to use them

By English Tutor: Definition: Punctuation marks are any of the marks that are used to punctuate writing.  They are fairly easy to identify in a sentence and in a paragraph of writing. These include: comma, colon, full stop, question mark, exclamation mark, inverted comma and dashes. Punctuation marks come from punctuate which is to interrupt at intervals. Some punctuation marks […]

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